Initial stages of group therapy

Each stage differs in the condition of clients, effective therapeutic strategies, and optimal leadership characteristics. For example, in early treatment, clients can be emotionally fragile, ambivalent about relinquishing chemicals, and resistant to treatment. Thus, treatment strategies focus on immediate concerns: Also, to establish a stable working group, a relatively active leader emphasizes therapeutic factors like hope, group cohesion, and universality.

Initial stages of group therapy

A person early in recovery is at greater risk for returning to use than someone with 3, 6, or even 18 months of abstinence Johnson ; Project MATCH The better clients are prepared for treatment, however, the longer they stay in treatment. If clinicians ensure that clients come to the group with appropriate expectations, both clinicians and clients can expect a greater degree of success.

Group leaders should conduct initial individual sessions with the candidate for group to form a therapeutic alliance, to reach consensus on what is to be accomplished in therapy, to educate the client about group therapy, to allay anxiety related to joining a group, and to explain the group agreement.

These activities may take as little as one meeting or as long as several weeks Rutan and Stone Normally, the longer the expected duration of the group, the longer the preparation phase.

Clients should have an opportunity to air any concerns, especially if they are apprehensive about their cultural status within the group. The process of preparing the client for participation in group therapy begins as early as the initial contact between the client and the program.

Preparation meetings serve a dual purpose. First, they ensure that clients understand expectations and are willing and able to meet them.

Initial stages of group therapy

Second, these meetings help clients become familiar with group therapy processes. Pregroup interviews are widely used to gather useful information about clients and prepare them for what they can expect from a group.

Clients should be thoroughly informed about what group therapy will be Initial stages of group therapy. In addition, client preparation should address the following: They should also recognize that while the first 3 months of treatment after detoxification are critical, fully effective treatment takes much longer.

Let new members know they may be tempted to leave the group at times. It should be emphasized that although the work is difficult and even upsetting at times, clients gain a great deal from persistent commitment to the process and should resist any temptation to leave the group.

Clients also should be encouraged to discuss thoughts about leaving the group when they arise so that the antecedents of these thoughts can be examined and resolved. Give prospective and novice members an opportunity to express anxiety about group work, and help allay their fears with information.

For some prospective members, group process work may need to be demythologized. Misperceptions should be countered to keep them from interfering with group participation. With help, clients can explain how they think group work can help them, identify their preferences, and articulate realistic goals.

Leaders can use this information to be sure that clients are placed in groups most likely to fulfill their aspirations. In preparing prospective members for a group experience, it is important to be sensitive to people who are different from the majority of the other participants in some way.

Such a person may be much older or younger than the rest of the group, the lone woman, the only member with a particular disorder, or the person from a distinctive ethnic or cultural minority.

The leader should consult privately with people who stand out in the group to determine from their unique perspective how they are experiencing the group.

They should always be allowed to be the experts on their own situation. Further, clients should be encouraged to define the extent of their identification with the groups to which they belong and to determine what that identification implies.

The fixed membership format provides more time to discuss issues of difference prior to joining a group. A person unlike the rest of the group may be asked by the other group members: How do you think you would feel in a group in which you differ from other group members?

What would it be like to be in a group where everyone else is a strong believer in something, such as AA, and you are not? Such questions might be coupled with positive comments that stress the benefits that a unique perspective may bring to the group.

It is important to explore issues of difference in advance of group placement. It similarly is important to acknowledge cultural or ethnic backgrounds and to emphasize that differences can be strengths that can contribute to the group.

If a client believes that a particular group situation would be uncomfortable, however, the counselor may offer the client other treatment options.

It is important at times, for instance, to prepare group members for situations in which others have symptoms that could offend or repel them. Their responsibilities are specified in group agreements, discussed later in this chapter.

Initial stages of group therapy

Increasing Retention Throughout the initial sessions of therapy, clients are particularly vulnerable to return to substance use and to discontinue treatment. The first month appears to be especially critical Margolis and Zweben Retention rates are affected positively by client preparation, maximum client involvement during the early stages of treatment, the use of feedback, prompts to encourage attendance, and the provision of wraparound services such as child care and transportation to make it possible or easier for clients to attend regularly.

Consideration needs to be given to the timing and length of groups, too, because these factors affect retention.

To achieve maximum involvement in group therapy during this period, motivational techniques, such as psychoeducation and attendance prompts, may be used to engage the client.Group leaders should conduct initial individual sessions with the candidate for group to form a therapeutic alliance, to reach consensus on what is to be accomplished in therapy, to educate the client about group therapy, to allay anxiety related to joining a group, and to explain the group agreement.

Group Therapy is traditionally broken down into 4 key stages: initial, transition, working and final. These group therapy stages are essential parts of a chemical dependency recovery program. Find out how the 4 key stages of group therapy work together for effective results.

Transcript of Groups: Initial-Transition-Working-Final Stages. Groups: Initial-Transition-Working-Final Stages Chapter 7: Transition Stage of a Group Chapter 8: Working Stage of a Group Chapter 9: Final Stage of a Group Chapter 6: Initial Stages of Groups Characteristics of Initial Stage Participants test the atmosphere and get acquainted.

Groups: Initial-Transition-Working-Final Stages Chapter 7: Transition Stage of a Group Chapter 8: Working Stage of a Group Chapter 9: Final Stage of a Group. Start studying Yalom's Stages in group therapy.

Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. A simple way to remember the stages of group therapy is as follows: form, storm, norm, perform, and adjourn.

For its members, a therapy group begins with the group’s first gathering (form). Early meetings are frequently accompanied by some level of conflict (storm) as members learn to work together and establish the “rules” of the group.

5 Stages of Treatment - Substance Abuse Treatment: Group Therapy - NCBI Bookshelf